You may well ask what we were thinking, agreeing to go glamping in the bitter depths of winter but when we agreed to review a two night stay at the luxury Caalm Camp in Dorset, it was with the express purpose of proving, to ourselves and to friends and family, that winter glamping is entirely possible!

Caalm Camp is an award-winning site which is home to six traditionally made Mongolian Yurts.  Originally a dairy farm, the Camp has been family run for the last 6 years and claims to put the ‘glam’ in ‘glamping’.  It is in a beautiful setting, surrounded by countryside, and with no city lights to interfere with your stargazing come night time.  Each Yurt is named after a different wildflower and during our stay we were in Daisy.

Although our journey was pretty straightforward it took us around 5 hours to get down to Dorset but we were met with a friendly face when we pulled up; the owner, Mark, greeted us warmly and showed us around, explaining how everything operated.

Mark was an incredible host, making sure we had everything that we needed throughout our stay and recommending local places we could explore.  He was particularly helpful on the ‘staying warm’ front (more on that later…) and we felt he really went out of his way to ensure we were having the best stay possible.

The Yurts themselves are absolutely stunning.  From the intricately painted designs to the use of horse hair in their construction (not a bolt or nail in sight!), you really felt as though you were getting an authentic experience.  In each Yurt is a double bed and two single beds, perfect for us as a family of four although Caalm Camp do say that it is possible for a yurt to sleep six.

The Yurts come equipped with a toasty log burner to keep it nice and warm, crisp bedlinen and cosy blankets, an outside fire pit, drinking water tap and a picnic bench as well.  We didn’t make use of the outside facilities as temperatures were in the minuses but I can imagine it being the perfect place to gaze at the stars in the summer months.

I am going to be honest and say that I am not a fan of camping; I don’t understand why people would pay to be cold and wet when they sleep and why they would find enjoyment in using damp and even chillier facilities.  Even though we were glamping, which is by nature slightly different, it’s still something I was concerned about but it really couldn’t have been further from the truth.

There is a building called The Old Haybarn on site which offers shared kitchen facilities, a communal dining and social area complete with TV and a selection of children’s toys, books and board games, and a private wet room for each of the Yurts.  Incidentally, Daisy Yurt is closest to the Old Haybarn so if you don’t fancy walking far in the cold and dark then ask for that one when you book!

There is also a games room complete with two resident goats(!), a tennis table and a pool table.  My only thought here is that it would have been nice if this room could have had some patio heaters as it was bitter.  It is in the old dairy barn so has very little insulation and although Meg and Eli enjoyed having a game or two of table tennis, I couldn’t stand the temperature!

But I know the major question of the moment is whether we were warm in our Yurt?

If you are familiar with our travelling experiences you will know that we can’t go anywhere without having a little ‘adventure’.  Think James getting lost at 12am in an unfamiliar French city after our hotel was booked for the wrong night and having to be retrieved by me after I’d persuaded some terrified hotel receptionist to watch the kids.  Think driving past our Appartamento in Tuscany several times, commenting each time that it ‘looked very much’ like the place we were meant to be staying but didn’t quite match with the sat nav and you get the idea.

So were we warm in our Yurt?

The straightforward answer is that when our log burner was going, we were incredibly warm.  There are logs available for use in your log burner and these come free of charge.  There is also the possibility to purchase a bucket of coal for £3 which we were advised by Mark to do and to place the coal in the burner overnight, ensuring heat the whole night through.  I don’t think that we had quite made it clear to Mark that fire and James don’t mix however and the first morning we woke, snug as little bugs in our beds, but with temperatures absolutely freezing in the Yurt.  In short, our fire had gone out.  And of course we had run out of matches the night before.

Cue James driving to the nearest petrol station to get some matches and a big thank you to the gentleman who offered him what he thought was a box of matches, free of charge, but which actually turned out to be a box of staples.  You can’t make this stuff up!

But honestly, once we had spoken to Mark in the morning and figured out how to use the burner properly overnight, the second night we woke to find that we were much, much, warmer.  In fact, when the log burner was going it took about 20 minutes for the Yurt to heat up and you would never have known you were in a Mongolian Yurt in the middle of the Dorset countryside in January!

Additional facilities on-site include a children’s playground, a shared fit pit area and a shared picnic area, all of which would be ideal if you were staying in a larger group.  Caalm Camp does allow hen and stag parties, as well as big family groups but each Yurt is far enough away that you don’t really hear anyone else.

The pathways are also well lit and clearly marked so there’s no worry about losing your way if you need to use the bathroom in the middle of the night.

There is plenty to do in the surrounding area from visiting the beautiful Shaftesbury to taking some local alpacas for a walk and Mark is more than willing to recommend places to go to explore and eat if you need advice from a local.

Overall, our winter glamping experience was a very positive one.  The camp site is well looked after, well thought through and we would definitely recommend a visit, even in winter!

*We were offered a two night stay at Caalm Camp for the purpose of this review.  All thoughts and opinions are our own.

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There’s nothing like having to do the school run or head out to work in the blistering cold to make you start dreaming of the summer sun, is there?!  I am a big fan of the colder months; when you can stay indoors and wrap yourself in a big blanket with a steaming mug of hot chocolate but I didn’t feel quite so pleased when I was trying to scrape ice off my windscreen first thing this morning!


That said, when I received a hamper full of Christmas goodies from Jet2 earlier in the week, it definitely put me in a more festive frame of mind.  As you can see from my unboxing video, I do love a good surprise and this one definitely contains enough to keep us going throughout December as Meg and Eli (and let’s be honest…me as well!) get more…and more…and more excited!



Better yet, if you are craving that summer sun then Jet2 are running a superb competition: every day from the 1st to the 26th December someone will win a Jet2 holiday!  All you have to do is correctly answer the holiday-themed question and you’ll be in with a chance of winning.  Imagine if you could be popping that underneath your Christmas tree this year.

If you pre-register before tomorrow you also get an extra daily entry.


Thank you to Jet2 for sending me this lovely hamper.

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I think it started when I found myself standing on a heathery hillside, blisteringly cold wind whipping my hair, trying to keep one of my two children in check so they weren’t inadvertently trampled, hand-feeding a wild reindeer who looked as though they’d like nothing more than to give me a swift one-two with their antlers.  I think it started then…that feeling that maybe this trip was going to be a little bit more than I’d been expecting it to be.  

From the stunning view of the misty mountains as we drove down the windy A9 to the first morning we woke to find frost glistening on the fields outside our lodge.  The flush of success when we climbed a particularly steep section of hill and looked out across the vast autumnal landscape and the satisfaction of hunting for the Loch Ness monster.  The local cafe which stayed open 20 minutes past closing time just so we could enjoy a hot chocolate out of the cold to the kindly gentleman who stood on the shores of Loch Lomond with me talking about the beauty of the scenery…we definitely had a trip to remember.

We took the opportunity during Meg and Eli’s half term to head up to the Cairngorms National Park in North-East Scotland.  It took us (without counting the numerous stops we made to empty tiny bladders) around six and a half hours to drive from our home up to the lodge where we were staying.

The Cairngorms National Park is twice the size of the Lake District and home to an array of mountains, rivers, lochs, villages and wildlife.  Neither James nor the kids had ever been to Scotland before and I have to say that this was probably the best way to experience the country for the first time.  We stayed in the town of Aviemore which is well known for being a tourist spot, although we landed out of season so found that it was pretty quiet.


When I say ‘short break’ we were there from Saturday to Wednesday and we really tried to hit the ground running.  We broke up travelling on both the Saturday and the Wednesday with a long stopover at two different spots: the Drumpellier Country Park and Loch Lomond and this really helped with any travelling fatigue.

The weather was brisk; some days it was mild by midday but others it was just bitterly cold and as you might have expected, the higher we climbed, the more vicious the wind and the lower the temperature dropped.


I’ve mentioned before that we are a family who love to be outdoors so for us, this was the perfect break.  We would get up and have a semi-leisurely morning before heading out for the day.  Autumn was the best time of year to visit too as everywhere we looked there was just a riot of golden colour.  It took my breath away more than once to look out across at the landscape and see the trees in all their orange, yellow, red and gold glory.


We paid for two main experiences whilst we were there; the hand-feeding of the herd of wild reindeer and to get into Urquhart Castle which offered some stunning views of Loch Ness.


Going Nessie hunting had been Eli’s only request for the trip and although he is convinced the monster lives on beneath the water, we can report that we spotted no hint of the legend!

For the most part we went out and explored the local area, climbing hills and walking around local lakes such as Loch Morlich.  James tried out a local brewery tour and I took the kids book shopping and hot chocolate drinking in Aviemore.  We did the ‘tourist’ thing with a day spent at Loch Ness and watched the sun set over glistening waters and we ate out and cooked in our lodge when it suited.  I can confirm that the local food was as good as the local brew (or so James assures me…) and a trip to The Winking Owl is a must if you happen to be staying near to Aviemore.


We had wanted to ride on the Funicular whilst we were in the area, as this is recommended as one of the top ways to see the views across the National Park but unfortunately it was closed for yearly maintenance on our main sightseeing days so we didn’t get the opportunity to do this.


I have to admit however, that despite everything we got up to the real highlight for me was that first day when we trekked up into the hills and got up close with a herd of wild reindeer.  It isn’t something I had ever imagined doing but it 100% felt like a true bucket list moment and I am so pleased we did it.


If you’ve ever wanted to visit the Highlands then I would definitely recommend it.  Just be prepared for things to close early in the winter season and for it to be cold.  I am not a person who can handle even the slightest chill in the air without running for a scarf and the central heating button but it was so worth being cold for the scenery we got to experience.  The views of the area are amazing.  The Cairngorms are the highest, coldest and snowiest place in Britain and although we only got to see a dusting of snow I can certainly attest to the remaining two claims.


You might think you’ve seen beauty but I can honestly say that the Highlands stole a part of my heart and we will certainly be returning.


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Some of you may have spotted from my Instagram that I recently went on a trip to Chicago.  This was a huge deal for me; my first time in the US and a meet-up with some ladies which I met through being on Youtube.

 
It sounds so strange to say it out loud in that way…it certainly sounded strange at immigration when I landed at O’Hare airport as well!  But although I never quite believed that I would actually travel to America when we planned the trip well over a year ago, somehow when we were altogether it felt entirely natural.
 
 
These are women which I speak to on a regular basis, outside of just commenting on each other’s content.  Women whose lives I knew about, and who I felt I have come to know fairly well so although it was odd to think we’d never actually physically all met, as soon as we were together it was just a whole lot of fun!
 
 
Of course with us all being on Booktube the obvious reason behind our meet up was to enjoy some of the more bookish delights in the city but we also did a number of touristy things as well which was ideal for me and my first trip across the pond.  I spent a couple of days in Madison with Katie before heading into Chicago to meet up with Mollie and Julie.  Although this wasn’t our original plan I feel like it worked out so perfectly as I got to see some of the Mid-West as well as the HUGE city which is Chicago.
 

 

 
We went on an architectural boat tour in Chicago which was probably one of the highlights of my trip.  It meant that we got to see parts of the city we would probably never have discovered otherwise as well as getting some insight into the history of the city and the surrounding area.  When I say that Chicago is HUGE, I really mean it.  Everything, buildings included is on a vast scale and just looking up made you feel really, really tiny.
 

 

 
Shockingly I didn’t take too many pictures of the trip but I did a whole lot of filming and I am currently working my way through the footage which I hope to be able to share and upload soon.  We filmed a number of collaborative videos too which will also be uploaded soon by the other ladies.
 

 

 

 
I will also be sharing separately the experiences we had of the bookstores in Chicago as we visited a good number and I feel they very much deserve their own post!
 
 
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It wouldn’t be a school holiday if we didn’t jump on the train and head into Liverpool and this summer turned out to be no different when we were invited to come along to the British Music Experience and check out their new summer programme.


The British Music Experience is housed in the Cunard Building, right on the docks and is a fantastic location for this interesting and diverse attraction.  The Experience tells the story of music from the last 70 years through memorabilia, costumes and instruments.


We were given a guided tour through the different decades which was a lot of fun and there was a quiz to keep the kids interested.  As a musical family we really enjoyed getting to discover the roots of some of our favourite bands and Meg in particular was excited to learn more about The Beatles (her current preferred choice alongside Little Mix!)


For me, the most fascinating section was definitely the early 90’s and then moving into the BritPop era as this was a huge part of my childhood.  It was a little cringe-worthy to remember the mania which used to surround bands like Boyzone and Take That but a lot of fun too and trying to explain to Meg and Eli about the bands we used to like along with our tour guide was amusing as she just looked at us like we’d never been young enough to enjoy bands like the Spice Girls!


We also attended a story-telling workshop complete with percussion instruments in which the kids had to help complete the adventure by playing along.  At 8 years old, Meg was probably slightly too old but Eli was very keen to get involved and I think for younger children it would be fab.

Just outside of the room where the storytelling workshop was held there is also a craft table set up although we didn’t stop to have a go at this.


Without a doubt though, the best part of the experience for us was the Gibson Interactive Studio where there was a whole host of instruments available for the kids (and the adults) to have a go at playing along with a recording studio and a dance studio.


Both Meg and Eli loved that they were able to get hands-on and have a go and we could easily have spent a couple of hours just in this section alone.  I practically had to drag them away and remind them that we needed to go and eat lunch at some point!

There is also a cafe on-site; the Star Cafe is open to visitors and members of the public (you don’t have to be going through the Experience) and serves a selection of hot and cold drinks  and food as well.  We kicked our tour around the Experience off with a croissant and juice and it went down very well.

We love Liverpool anyway but I would definitely say that a visit to the British Music Experience would be a fantastic addition to any trip down to the Docks or just when exploring the city.

*We were offered entry into the BME in return for a blog post.  All thoughts and opinions are, of course, our own.

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